Open Heart Surgery

November 24, 2010

The Maximes et Réflexions morales (1664) of François de La Rochefoucauld is a collection of witty, cutting, cynical, funny, brutally honest, depressing, and occasionally comforting dissections of the human heart and spirit.  They are of a type of literature for which the French are known, and the tradition of which they are a part is still alive among the elite of modern France.  Consider the quotation from Claude Chabrol in his recent obituary from the NYTimes.  Nietzsche and Oscar Wilde also come to mind.

Here are a few favorites, not in their original order, from my recent dip into the text:

L’hypocrisie est un hommage que le vice rend à la vertu.
Hypocrisy is the homage vice pays to virtue.

La philosophie triomphe aisément des maux passés et des maux à venir. Mais les maux présents triomphent d’elle.
Philosophy triumps easily over past misfortunes and those to come.  But present ones triumph over it.

Les vieillards aiment à donner de bons préceptes, pour se consoler de n’être plus en état de donner de mauvais exemples.
Old people love to give good advice to console themselves for not being in a state to set a bad example.

C’est une espèce de coquetterie de faire remarquer qu’on n’en fait jamais.
It is a way of flirting to claim that one never flirts.

Les vertus se perdent dans l’intérêt, comme les fleuves se perdent dans la mer.
Virtues lose themselves in self-interest as rivers lose themselves in the sea.

Quand les vices nous quittent, nous nous flattons de la créance que c’est nous qui les quittons.
When our vices quit us, we flatter ourselves by believing that we have quit them.

Comme c’est le caractère des grands esprits de faire entendre en peu de paroles beaucoup de choses, les petits esprits au contraire ont le don de beaucoup parler, et de ne rien dire.
Great characters can say much with few words, while on the contrary, petty characters talk a great deal and say nothing.

Le désir de paraître habile empêche souvent de le devenir.
The desire to appear clever often presents us from being so.

La vertu n’irait pas si loin si la vanité ne lui tenait compagnie.
Virtue would never get so far if vanity did not accompany it.

La souveraine habileté consiste à bien connaître le prix des choses.
The greatest cleverness consists in knowing the value of everything.

C’est une grande habileté que de savoir cacher son habileté.
It is a great cleverness to hide one’s cleverness.

Ce qui paraît générosité n’est souvent qu’une ambition déguisée qui méprise de petits intérêts, pour aller à de plus grands.
What appears as generosity is often nothing but disguised ambition that has put aside petty self-interest in order to advance a greater one.

Une des choses qui fait que l’on trouve si peu de gens qui paraissent raisonnables et agréables dans la conversation, c’est qu’il n’y a presque personne qui ne pense plutôt à ce qu’il veut dire qu’à répondre précisément à ce qu’on lui dit. Les plus habiles et les plus complaisants se contentent de montrer seulement une mine attentive, au même temps que l’on voit dans leurs yeux et dans leur esprit un égarement pour ce qu’on leur dit, et une précipitation pour retourner à ce qu’ils veulent dire; au lieu de considérer que c’est un mauvais moyen de plaire aux autres ou de les persuader, que de chercher si fort à se plaire à soi-même, et que bien écouter et bien répondre est une des plus grandes perfections qu’on puisse avoir dans la conversation.
One of the reasons why so few people seem reasonable and attractive in conversation is that almost everyone thinks more about what he himself wants to say than about answering exactly what is said to him.  The cleverest and most polite people  are content merely to look attentive, while all the time we see in their eyes and minds a distraction from what is being said to them and an impatience to get  back to what they themselves want to say.  Instead, they should reflect that striving so hard to please themselves is a poor way to please or convince other people, land that the ability to listen well and answer well is one of the greatest merits we can have in conversation.

Dans toutes les professions chacun affecte une mine et un extérieur pour paraître ce qu’il veut qu’on le croie. Ainsi on peut dire que le monde n’est composé que de mines.
In all professions,  we affect exterior appearances of what owe wish people to think us.  So, one can say that the world is made of nothing but appearances.

Et un coup de chapeau à mon professeur de Français – cette  petite, vieux, Alsacienne, Mme Schmidt, qui m’a initié à cette maxime:
L’absence diminue les médiocres passions, et augmente les grandes, comme le vent éteint les bougies et allume le feu.

And a tip of the hat to my French teacher – that little old Alsatian, Madame Schmidt, who introduced me to this maxim:
Absence diminishes mediocre passions and strengthens great ones, just as the wind blows out a candle and kindles a fire.


Oscar

January 26, 2005

The chief advantage that would result from the establishment of Socialism is, undoubtedly, the fact that Socialism would relieve us from that sordid necessity of living for others which, in the present condition of things, presses so hardly upon almost everybody.“Only Oscar Wilde could justify socialism with selfishness, and be funny at the same time. In the workers’ paradise, everyone’s needs will be taken care of, and we won’t be burdened by the promptings of conscience that tell us that there is suffering abroad. We will be free, without guilt, to simply develop ourselves, in all of our finery and frippery.

Note, he says that the “sordid necessity” of worrying about others presses upon “almost” everybody – he was quite aware that some people weren’t bothered at all. Some of them were rapacious barons of industry, some of them were worthless fops. I think he was brilliant enough to be a genius and to consider himself something of one of the latter.

How strange he would have found it that today, in the bosom of capitalism, we have achieved, after a fashion, his vision! That is, we are obsessed with lifestyle. That’s what Oscar’s personal aestheticsim was all about, the fashioning of one’s life, with style, into a self-contained work of art. Life as an aesthetic production, not a moral or ethical one. By freeing oneself of quotidian limits, one could let one’s individual self flower into all sorts of wonderful and absurd creations, produce art for art’s sake, be beautiful, cultivate the beautiful, and live the beautiful life. Sounds like an advertisement for a resort, a face cream, or a new set of living room furniture, doesn’t it? Oscar never let irony drop, and so he was never so shallow in his pursuit of the purely aesthetic… and he came to think differently, after being thrown in jail for being a bit more pretty and witty than Victorian society could bear. He came to see clearly that there was life, and there was style, but there was no lifestyle.

Our consumer society has puffed itself up on the exact opposite of this idea. Style is not an accessory or an ornament to life – not a delightful extra to enhance or add to pleasure. No, style is life, and you must struggle for a lifestyle that suits your aspirations. And to what does one aspire…a lifestyle, of course. And if you doubt the truth of it, just look into a marketing demographics magazine where you will find your own individual self pigeon-holed as, perhaps, “empty-nester”, “young, up and coming”, “ethnic striver”, “blue blood leisure,” etc. etc. etc. In Oscar’s vision, we would all create our personal lifestyles, but now, we just shop for it at the mall.